“Doomscrolling Is Slowly Eroding Your Mental Health”

“Doomscrolling Is Slowly Eroding Your Mental Health”

In the midst of an ineptly managed pandemic and ineptly managed civil unrest and economic fiasco people try to make sense of it by reading everything they can. Scrolling through post and news story after news story is called “doomscrolling” and it destroys your mental health. Sadly, much of the bull shit is not from random social media posts but from actual experts who spew nonsense.

This did not age well: “Georgia’s Experiment in Human Sacrifice: The state is about to find out how many people need to lose their lives to shore up the economy.”

This did not age well: “Georgia’s Experiment in Human Sacrifice: The state is about to find out how many people need to lose their lives to shore up the economy.”

On April 29th, The Atlantic published an article by writer Amanda Mull, titled: “Georgia’s Experiment in Human Sacrifice: The state is about to find out how many people need to lose their lives to shore up the economy.” What happened: Deaths fell. By a lot.

Journalism: I don’t think that word means what you think it means

Journalism: I don’t think that word means what you think it means

“27 police officers injured during largely peaceful” protests. Or something. Several examples of creative reporting, including the MSNBC reporting saying protests are not unruly as a building burns behind him. Words used to have common meanings but apparently not any more. This post is not about the protests about the reporting.

Begging the question fallacy, again: This is exactly who you are

Begging the question fallacy, again: This is exactly who you are

Police shove an elderly, 75 year old man, causing a serious head and brain injury. They walk right past his unconscious body. Then they lie about it. And afterwards the city proclaims this “doesn’t reflect the true character of the Buffalo PD” when, in fact, it is exactly their true character. This is known as the “Begging the question fallacy”.